Welcome to Area 64 Assembly

The Area 64 Assembly of Alcoholics Anonymous is a service body to protect and respect the autonomy and the privilege of all A.A. groups in General Service Conference Area 64. The Assembly shall be ever mindful of the ideals expressed in the Twelve Traditions, the Twelve Concepts and the A.A. Service Manual, and shall strive to be the true voice and group conscience of Area 64. A.A. Unity and service shall ever be the Assembly’s primary purpose, and it shall encourage all Area 64 A.A. groups to participate in the business of the Assembly and to support the Assembly in its efforts to cooperate with the A.A. General Service Office and A.A. World Services.

AA Service Structure - Upside Down Triangle

Next Assembly - 1st Quarter Assembly

COUNTDOWN TO NEXT ASSEMBLY
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A.A.'s Legacy of Service

Recovery, Unity, Service—these are the Three Legacies given to the whole membership of A.A. by its founders and their fellow oldtimers. When this heritage was announced, at the St. Louis Convention in 1955, celebrating A.A.’s 20th birthday, Doctor Bob was already gone. But Bill W. spoke for him and the other pioneers, as well as for himself, in turning over to all of us the responsibility for A.A.’s continuation and growth. 

The A.A. Service Manual,” current version of the handbook first known as “The Third Legacy Manual,” may seem to be simply a guide to organization and procedure, and its approach is indeed practical. At the same time, it is based firmly upon spiritual principles, as Bill explains in his introduction to the manual, reprinted here to recall the development of our Third Legacy.

Our Twelfth Step—carrying the message—is the basic service that the A.A. Fellowship gives; this is our principal aim and the main reason for our existence. Therefore, A.A. is more than a set of principles; it is a society of alcoholics in action. We must carry the message, else we ourselves can wither and those who haven’t been given the truth may die.

Hence, an A.A. service is anything whatever that helps us to reach a fellow sufferer—ranging all the way from the Twelfth Step itself to a ten-cent phone call and a cup of coffee, and to A.A.’s General Service Office for national and international action. The sum total of all these services is our Third Legacy of Service.

Services include meeting places, hospital cooperation, and intergroup offices; they mean pamphlets, books, and good publicity of almost every description. They call for committees, delegates, trustees, and conferences. And, not to be forgotten, they need voluntary money contributions from within the Fellowship.

Bill W., from A.A.’s Legacy of Service